The Villa

The square-plan residence spreads on an overall area of about 4,000 square meters on two levels. The frescoed rooms, as well as the dance and music hall, the dining rooms, the jardin d’hiver and the Suite Rossa are located on the main floor.
On the first floor, accessed via a monumental staircase topped by a dome, we find all other bedrooms, accessed through a corridor running around the entire house.
Relaxing in the vast swimming pool, 20 meters long and 10 meters wide, located beside the aviary, guests may experience a swim with the background of the Verona hills.
Three other buildings, once used as stable, wine cellar and staff quarters, surround the villa. The villa’s peculiar location guarantees privacy and security for guests.


Until the 1990s, an Italian garden had surrounded the villa; following the last refurbishments, an English style lawn was chosen, also to optimize the land utilization around the villa and the swimming pool.
In the late 19th century, at the behest of Cesare Trezza, the 40-hectare parkland surrounding the Villa – which historians regard as inspired from the Villa Reale in Monza – was enriched by a labyrinth of paths and ponds with fountains and waterfalls. The wood, much appreciated by botanists, spreads among vast meadows, offering breathaking views from paths and trails which allow long walks, jogging sessions and mountain bike rides, beautiful occasions to admire the local wildlife.

The aviary, built in the 16th century, featuring a copper-plated iron dome and attributed to the celebrated Sanmicheli school, is visible from the Marcellise valley and is located near to the swimming pool. Once home to rare species of birds, it is now dedicated to charming cultural and entertainment events.

A central, inner cloister for walking and playing, the dance and music hall, the parlours and the library: unique settings to be experienced by the guests who choose Villa d’Acquarone.
The origin of the chapel of Villa d’Acquarone, in a perfect state of preservation, can be traced back to the mid 17th century when commissioned by Cristoforo and Gianfrancesco Muselli.
The original structure has a rectangular plan with a barrel vault. The precious fresco that, according to Lanceni, is to be attributed to Biagio Falcieri, dates back to 1684 and depicts the miracles of St. Anthony of Padua.
The parlours on the ground floor, as well as the library, are enriched with exquisite antique frescoes, among which the magnificent work of Lodovico Dorigny dated 1687 represented the Winds, on the ceilings of dance and music hall.
The most important room in the villa is the central “Salone dei Venti” (Hall of the Winds), featuring a groin-vaulted ceiling with a central elliptical dome where a mechenical system, linked with an external vane, indicates the sixteen wind directions on a “Compass Rose”.
Mythological scenes of goddesses of air, earth and sea, are portrayed on each side of the tripartite ceiling: Poseidon on one side, Aeolus on the opposite, in a great and harmonic fresco of Lodovico Dorigny dated 1687.
The ancient two-story library hosts over a thousand precious volumes which are generously kept available in the refined cabinets. Here, one may immerse in culture and knowledge, breathing an atmosphere of past conversations.
The parlour on the ground floor, as well as the library, are enriched with exquisite antique frescoes, among which the magnificent work of Lodovico Dorigny dated 1687 represented the Winds, on the ceilings of dance and music hall.

Dining Hall